Month: November 2016

Changing QoS during Veeam Backups

Tintri’s QoS is a great tool to limit storage bandwidth per VM, but what happens when a backup occurs?  Well, QoS will also limit your backup storage IOPS. If this is an issue in your environment, you might consider clearing the QoS during backup.

As an example of clearing QoS when a backup occurs,  a PowerShell script is now available that interacts with Veeam Backup and Replication.  The script, Veeam_Backup_Tintri_QoS.ps1 is available on GitHub.  The file, README.md has the information needed to run the script.

Basically the script polls the Veeam backup server every 10 seconds. When a Veeam backup job has started, the script finds the associated storage.  If the storage is on a VMstore and QoS is set, then the QoS is cleared.  After the job is done, the script restores the QoS settings.  A TGC server is required since the script connects only to a TGC.

Below is a diagram of Veeam_Backup_Tintri_QoS.ps1 (Backup Script) running in the Veeam backup server.

.veeam_tgc_diagram

However the backup script could be in a separate VM.

This script could possibly be used as a template for other backup vendors.  Results may very.  Veeam made it straight-forward with a PowerShell plug-in.

Until next time,

– Rick –

tintri_veeam_logos_small

PowerShell VM CSV Report

Greetings,

A customer via a colleague, Satinder Sharma, wanted to have a CSV output from Get-TintriVM. Their attempt was:

Get-TintriVM  | Export-Csv WS_inventory.csv

This does nothing.  After some experimentation and assistance from Dhruv Vermula, we have this:

Get-TintriVM | Select-Object {$_.vmware.name}, {$_.Uuid.UuId} | Export-csv vm2.csv

This works, but the columns are “$_.vmware.name” and “$_Uuid.Uuid”, which is not very friendly.  So I created created a small script, VmCsvReport, that is similar to a blog post “Obtain a VM CSV Report“.  This script creates nice columns; for example, “VM Name” instead of “$_.vmware.name” and creates a CSV file.

The script uses @{Expression} to create alias columns.

 $ex = @{Expression={$_.vmware.name};label="VM Name"},
       @{Expression={$_.stat.sortedstats.LatencyTotalMs};label="Total Latency"},
       @{Expression={$_.stat.sortedstats.LatencyNetworkMs};label="Network Latency"},
       @{Expression={$_.stat.sortedstats.LatencyStorageMs};label="Storage Latency"},
       @{Expression={$_.stat.sortedstats.LatencyDiskMs};label="Disk Latency"}

The output of Get-TintriVM is piped into Select-Object using the aliases in $ex.  Then $results is piped to the Export-Csv cmdlet to create a CSV file.  This could be done in one line, but I broke it up so that I could easily examine the output in debug.

$result = Get-TintriVM -TintriServer $conn | Select-Object $ex
$result | Export-Csv $csv_file

The specified VM information is in the CSV file which Excel can read quite easily.

Unfortunately, the columns are hard-coded in the script, because the PowerShell Toolkit does not have a cmdlet that maps the CSV download API.  I couldn’t suss-out a way to have configurable columns similar “Obtain a VM CSV Report“. If you know a way, please let me know.

Until next time,

– Rick –

Automation, Cloud, Containers, and PySDK

Greetings,

November has started with a bang of announcements and publications:

  1. Tintri Raises the Bar for Enterprise Cloud Build on Web Services Architecture and RESTful APIs” discusses Tintri’s architecture, automation, container support, analytics, and public cloud integration.  There will be a webinar on November 10th at 11 am Pacific with Kieran Harty and Steve Herrod.
  2. The Register’s article on Tintri’s Chatbot , automation, cloud, and container support talks about Tintri’s Web Services approach that makes everything API-accessible which makes automation , container support, public cloud integration, and chat-bot possible.
  3. ComputerWeekly.com published an article of “Tintri adding VMware and Flocker persistent container storage” which discusses Tintri’s container Flocker support in more detail.
  4. Tintri announced the release of the Python SDK (PySDK). This PySDK was used in the above mentioned chat-bot. With PySDK, Tintri will be able to integrate easier with automation platforms like OpenStack.
  5. Tintri published a white paper on Tintri’s vRealize Orchestrator Plugin. Now VMware’s vRealize orchestrator can manage Tintri storage.  This allows scripts in vRealize to invoke Tintri management APIs.

This is just the beginning of Tintri’s cloud announcements.  More will be coming in the next months.  Until next time,

– Rick –